Posts tagged NASA

President John F. Kennedy’s stirring “moon speech” was delivered at Rice University in Houston on Sept. 12, 1962. 

President John F. Kennedy’s stirring “moon speech” was delivered at Rice University in Houston on Sept. 12, 1962. 

This amazing composite image from NASA took nine years to create and shows 10,000 multi-colored galaxies.
(Photo: AP via NASA)

This amazing composite image from NASA took nine years to create and shows 10,000 multi-colored galaxies.

(Photo: AP via NASA)

For the first time, a human-made object has entered interstellar space. NASA’s scrappy Voyager 1, which launched in 1977, has ventured past the sun and into vast reaches of space where nothing has traveled before: http://usat.ly/17tRexA

(Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

For the first time, a human-made object has entered interstellar space. NASA’s scrappy Voyager 1, which launched in 1977, has ventured past the sun and into vast reaches of space where nothing has traveled before: http://usat.ly/17tRexA

(Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

44 years ago today.

44 years ago today.

nwkarchivist:

30 Years Ago Today, Sally Ride Blasts Into Space & History

From a systems-engineering standpoint, it is easy to identify the point where Sally K. Ride began to leave the rest of the world behind. A flow chart of her life would show the crucial decision coming one day in 1977, when — as a 25-year-old astrophysicist winding up her doctoral work at Stanford University — she spotted an announcement in the campus newspaper about openings in the astronaut program, a career she had never even contemplated for herself. In what once would have been called an epiphany — but she herself would probably describe as a go/no-go decision node — she was up and out of the room before she had finished reading the notice, one of more than 1,000 women and nearly 7,000 men to apply for what would ultimately be the 35 slots in the astronaut class of 1978. Not everyone’s life resolves itself so neatly into yes- or-no decisions, taken in an instant and never looked back upon or regretted, but, if Sally Ride’s life proves anything, it is that the very smart are different from you and me.

Newsweek  June 13, 1983

nwkarchivist:

30 Years Ago Today, Sally Ride Blasts Into Space & History

From a systems-engineering standpoint, it is easy to identify the point where Sally K. Ride began to leave the rest of the world behind. A flow chart of her life would show the crucial decision coming one day in 1977, when — as a 25-year-old astrophysicist winding up her doctoral work at Stanford University — she spotted an announcement in the campus newspaper about openings in the astronaut program, a career she had never even contemplated for herself. In what once would have been called an epiphany — but she herself would probably describe as a go/no-go decision node — she was up and out of the room before she had finished reading the notice, one of more than 1,000 women and nearly 7,000 men to apply for what would ultimately be the 35 slots in the astronaut class of 1978. Not everyone’s life resolves itself so neatly into yes- or-no decisions, taken in an instant and never looked back upon or regretted, but, if Sally Ride’s life proves anything, it is that the very smart are different from you and me.

Newsweek  June 13, 1983

In response to a question we always get — ‘Can you protect the planet?’ — the answer to that is ‘no.’

jtotheizzoe:

The Earliest Days of NASA

Maria Popova, at Brain Pickings, happened upon a treasure trove of early NASA (and its airplane-only predecessor NACA) archive photos. They are really something. From biplanes to the Mercury capsule, pre-1950 aeronautics seemed to live by the motto of “If we build it, then we can go there.” That’s a sentiment we could use a bit more of.

More here.

This image of a Martian rock illuminated by white-light LEDs is part of the first set of nighttime images taken by Curiosity.
The images were taken on Jan. 22, after dark on the 165th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars. This rock target in the “Yellowknife Bay” area of Mars’ Gale Crater is called “Sayunei.”
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS (via NASA - MAHLI’s First Night Imaging of Martian Rock, White Lighting)

This image of a Martian rock illuminated by white-light LEDs is part of the first set of nighttime images taken by Curiosity.

The images were taken on Jan. 22, after dark on the 165th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars. This rock target in the “Yellowknife Bay” area of Mars’ Gale Crater is called “Sayunei.”

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS (via NASA - MAHLI’s First Night Imaging of Martian Rock, White Lighting)

How cool is this? Scientists with NASA’s Cassini mission have spotted two features shaped like “Pac-Man” on moons of Saturn. One was observed on the moon Mimas in 2010 and the latest on the moon Tethys. (Image by NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/SWRI)

How cool is this? Scientists with NASA’s Cassini mission have spotted two features shaped like “Pac-Man” on moons of Saturn. One was observed on the moon Mimas in 2010 and the latest on the moon Tethys.

(Image by NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/SWRI)

The space shuttle Endeavour will go right past Randy’s Donuts in Inglewood as it makes its way to its permanent home at the California Space Center. Meantime, there’s a model shuttle holding its spot. 
More photos of Endeavour’s journey: http://usat.ly/RlQuRv(Photo by Frederic J. Brown, AFP/Getty Images)

The space shuttle Endeavour will go right past Randy’s Donuts in Inglewood as it makes its way to its permanent home at the California Space Center. Meantime, there’s a model shuttle holding its spot. 

More photos of Endeavour’s journey: http://usat.ly/RlQuRv

(Photo by Frederic J. Brown, AFP/Getty Images)