Posts tagged curiosity

This image of a Martian rock illuminated by white-light LEDs is part of the first set of nighttime images taken by Curiosity.
The images were taken on Jan. 22, after dark on the 165th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars. This rock target in the “Yellowknife Bay” area of Mars’ Gale Crater is called “Sayunei.”
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS (via NASA - MAHLI’s First Night Imaging of Martian Rock, White Lighting)

This image of a Martian rock illuminated by white-light LEDs is part of the first set of nighttime images taken by Curiosity.

The images were taken on Jan. 22, after dark on the 165th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars. This rock target in the “Yellowknife Bay” area of Mars’ Gale Crater is called “Sayunei.”

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS (via NASA - MAHLI’s First Night Imaging of Martian Rock, White Lighting)

NASA's Mars Panorama Image

Click. Drag. Put your feet up and stay a while. 

Amazing.

Oh, hey, Curiosity rover. What’s new in your neck of the woods?

Here it is: the first color image of Mars from the Curiosity rover.
Also: NASA releases low-res video of Mars rover descent 
(Photo: NASA)

Here it is: the first color image of Mars from the Curiosity rover.

Also: NASA releases low-res video of Mars rover descent

(Photo: NASA)

"Red creme currently unavailable."
Photo via Oreo.

"Red creme currently unavailable."

Photo via Oreo.

Ooh, that Curiosity rover. It takes hipster pics AND has a sense of humor. Space = conquered?

Ooh, that Curiosity rover. It takes hipster pics AND has a sense of humor. Space = conquered?


This is one of the first images taken by NASA’s Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars early this morning. It was taken through a “fisheye” wide-angle lens on the left “eye” of a stereo pair of Hazard-Avoidance cameras on the left-rear side of the rover. The image is one-half of full resolution. The clear dust cover that protected the camera during landing has been sprung open. Part of the spring that released the dust cover can be seen at the bottom right, near the rover’s wheel. On the top left, part of the rover’s power supply is visible. As planned, the rover’s early engineering images are lower resolution. Larger color images from other cameras are expected later in the week when the rover’s mast, carrying high-resolution cameras, is deployed.
—Description from NASA. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Read more about the landing and mission.  

This is one of the first images taken by NASA’s Curiosity rover, which landed on Mars early this morning. It was taken through a “fisheye” wide-angle lens on the left “eye” of a stereo pair of Hazard-Avoidance cameras on the left-rear side of the rover. The image is one-half of full resolution. The clear dust cover that protected the camera during landing has been sprung open. Part of the spring that released the dust cover can be seen at the bottom right, near the rover’s wheel. 

On the top left, part of the rover’s power supply is visible. 

As planned, the rover’s early engineering images are lower resolution. Larger color images from other cameras are expected later in the week when the rover’s mast, carrying high-resolution cameras, is deployed.

—Description from NASA. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Read more about the landing and mission.  

The Mars rover Curiosity is set to land in a few hours on the ellipse marked on this image of Gale Crater. If the landing goes well, Curiosity will drive in subsequent months to science destinations on Mount Sharp, outside of the landing ellipse. Video: http://bcove.me/br5255wt

The Mars rover Curiosity is set to land in a few hours on the ellipse marked on this image of Gale Crater. If the landing goes well, Curiosity will drive in subsequent months to science destinations on Mount Sharp, outside of the landing ellipse. 

Video: http://bcove.me/br5255wt

NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory and Curiosity rover is expected to arrive on the red planet’s surface at 1:31 a.m. EDT Monday.
The forecast? Pink skies with a chance of water ice haze.
Curiosity will explore Gale Crater, which was created more than 3 billion years ago by a meteor.  At the bottom of the crater is a 3-mile-high mountain — Mount Sharp — that the rover will comb for signs of life.
(Photo: NASA)

NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory and Curiosity rover is expected to arrive on the red planet’s surface at 1:31 a.m. EDT Monday.

The forecast? Pink skies with a chance of water ice haze.

Curiosity will explore Gale Crater, which was created more than 3 billion years ago by a meteor.  At the bottom of the crater is a 3-mile-high mountain — Mount Sharp — that the rover will comb for signs of life.

(Photo: NASA)