Posts tagged journalism

More than half a million Americans with serious mental illness are falling through the cracks of a system in tatters, a USA TODAY special report shows.

More than half a million Americans with serious mental illness are falling through the cracks of a system in tatters, a USA TODAY special report shows.

Since 2006, there have been more than 200 mass killings in the United States.

Well-known images from Newtown, Aurora and Virginia Tech capture the nation’s attention, but similar bloody scenes happen with alarming frequency and much less scrutiny.

We examined FBI data — which defines a mass killing as four or more victims — as well as local police records and media reports to understand mass killings in America. They happen far more often than the government reports, and the circumstances of those killings — the people who commit them, the weapons they use and the forces that motivate them — are far more predictable than many might think.

Yet no one is keeping track.

A USA TODAY special report — learn more: http://usat.ly/1kiRW4F

Emerson College is changing the name of its journalism school to the Ron Burgundy School of Communication (for one day only). It’s kind of a big deal. 

(Photo by Frank Masi, Paramount via AP)

Emerson College is changing the name of its journalism school to the Ron Burgundy School of Communication (for one day only). It’s kind of a big deal.

(Photo by Frank Masi, Paramount via AP)

The ATF has locked up more than 1,000 people using controversial sting operations that entice suspects to rob nonexistent drug stash houses, a USA TODAY investigation has found. 

The ploy has quietly become a key part of the ATF’s crime-fighting arsenal, but also a controversial one: The stings are so aggressive and costly that some prosecutors have refused to allow them. They skirt the boundaries of entrapment, and in the past decade they have left at least seven suspects dead.

Learn more: http://usat.ly/16D6VRN

Poetry offers a different way into stories

image

Poetry and journalism seem to be opposite forms of writing — one is creative and fabricated; the other sticks to facts. But there is some cross over between the two.

Ezra Pound wrote, “Poetry is news that stays news.” So can language remain newsworthy?

Here are a few interesting examples of news and poetry overlapping:

  • Times Haiku: The New York Times has developed an algorithm that automatically detects poetry hidden in the paper’s front page. The best ones are published on this Tumblr.
  • L.A. Times Haiku: This Twitter handle offers L.A. Times headlines in haiku form.
  • American Life in Poetry: While not necessarily haikus, this project by Ted Kooser, the U.S. poet laureate from 2004-2006, offered newspapers a free weekly column featuring contemporary American poems.

These news haikus and Kooser’s project highlight great literary moments with articles and offer readers a different way into stories. And some of them are just beautiful.

Journalists and poets can learn from each other. Some poets write documentary-style poems about world events and the human condition, and journalists often use stylistic techniques to convey emotion, perspective and details to a reader, according to an article on the intersection of poetry and journalism in The Huffington Post. Ultimately, both rely on having someone on the other end read their words.

—Marlena Chertock

…readers not only want to know what we know, they also want to know how we’ve come to know it, and the practical limits of our knowledge.

Roy Peter Clark, in an essay about transparency in narrative journalism, on Poynter today.  (via poynterinstitute)

Dig this.

Pizza is the currency of newsrooms. Very classy, Chicago Tribune.

More than a dozen times a day, doctors sew up patients with sponges and other supplies mistakenly left inside. The mistake costs some victims their lives.
A USA TODAY review of government data, academic studies and legal records suggests that far more people may be victims of lost surgical objects than federal statistics suggest. And the medical community’s inaction comes at a high price.
There’s no federal reporting requirement when hospitals leave sponges or other items in patients, but research studies and government data suggest it happens between 4,500 and 6,000 times a year. That’s up to twice government estimates, which run closer to 3,000 cases, and sponges account for more than two-thirds of all incidents.
Read more of our special report: When health care makes you sick: http://usat.ly/15C6Cq7

More than a dozen times a day, doctors sew up patients with sponges and other supplies mistakenly left inside. The mistake costs some victims their lives.

A USA TODAY review of government data, academic studies and legal records suggests that far more people may be victims of lost surgical objects than federal statistics suggest. And the medical community’s inaction comes at a high price.

There’s no federal reporting requirement when hospitals leave sponges or other items in patients, but research studies and government data suggest it happens between 4,500 and 6,000 times a year. That’s up to twice government estimates, which run closer to 3,000 cases, and sponges account for more than two-thirds of all incidents.

Read more of our special report: When health care makes you sickhttp://usat.ly/15C6Cq7